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The student news site of Powell (Wyo.) High School

The Prowl

The student news site of Powell (Wyo.) High School

The Prowl

SOLAR REPERCUSSIONS

Remarks from students at Powell High school on their blemishes from the sun
Members+of+the+Powell+High+School+tennis+team+show+off+their+wrist+tanlines.+
Sophie Czirr
Members of the Powell High School tennis team show off their wrist tanlines.

Students at Powell High school have obtained a variety of tan lines throughout sports, activities, or simply being in the sun. The type of tan lines vary just as much as the student’s opinion on them. Some love to show off their tan marks while others choose to cover them up. 

“I tend to hide my tan line,” sophomore Kyra Morrow said. “I tend to hide my tan line because it not only shows how tan I was before, but it also tends to result in a bombardment of questions.” 

According to the owners of these tan lines, the most common way to obtain a noticeable mark is to consistently wear a similar item each day. 

“I wear this watch everyday,” junior Kenna Jacobsen said. “I run outside every day except for Sunday, so I am in the sun a lot.” 

There are ways to prevent these blemishes from appearing on your skin. Junior Isaac Stensing has found a few helpful ways to decrease the amount of tan lines that he will receive. 

“Wearing lots of sunscreen prevents tanning,” Stensing said. “You can get tan lines by covering, and getting sun on other parts of the skin.” 

If a tan mark is something you long for, there are several ways to get one. Morrow shares activities and tips on how to gain a trace from the sun. She also shares different ways to prevent undesired tan lines. 

“To gain tan lines, just wear a watch or a wristband over the summer,” Morrow said. “Go hiking, running or swimming with a watch or bracelet on. If you wish to prevent tan lines, my only advice is to either avoid vitamin D or to tan in a swimsuit.” 

Some owners hold conflicting feelings on how they personally feel about their tan lines. While others may choose to cover them up or show them off, some choose to do both. 

If I didn’t have my watch on I’m pretty sure everyone would notice it. I feel pretty proud of [my tan line]. I wear it with pride except for when I cover it up.

— junior Kenna Jacobsen said

“If I didn’t have my watch on I’m pretty sure everyone would notice it,” Jacobsen said. “I feel pretty proud of [my tan line]. I wear it with pride except for when I cover it up.” 

Other students aren’t opinionated about tan lines they possess. Stensing shares that he isn’t concerned with his tan line being viewed by others. 

“I feel pretty neutral about my tan line,” Stensing said. “I don’t really mind if people see it.” 

Whether one is ashamed, or chooses to let others view their tan line; a tan mark shows the progress of your skin beginning to darken. 

“My overall opinion on tan lines is that they show just how well you’ve tanned over the summer,” sophomore Kyra Morrow said. “They are a marker as to how far you’ve come.” 

SUNSCREEN ADVICE (directly from CDC)
Sunglasses

"Sunglasses protect your eyes from UV rays and reduce the risk of cataracts. They also protect the tender skin around your eyes from sun exposure.

Sunglasses that block both UVA and UVB rays offer the best protection. Most sunglasses sold in the United States, regardless of cost, meet this standard. Wrap-around sunglasses work best because they block UV rays from sneaking in from the side."

Shade

"You can reduce your risk of sun damage and skin cancer by staying in the shade under an umbrella, tree, or other shelter. Your best bet to protect your skin is to use sunscreen or wear protective clothing when you’re outside—even when you’re in the shade."

https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/basic_info/sun-safety.htm

Clothing

"When possible, wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants and skirts, which can provide protection from UV rays. If wearing this type of clothing isn’t practical, try to wear a T-shirt or a beach cover-up. Clothes made from tightly woven fabric offer the best protection. A wet T-shirt offers much less UV protection than a dry one, and darker colors may offer more protection than lighter colors. Some clothing is certified under international standards as offering UV protection."

https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/basic_info/sun-safety.htm

 

Hat

"For the most protection, wear a hat that has a brim all the way around that shades your face, ears, and the back of your neck. A tightly woven fabric, such as canvas, works best to protect your skin from UV rays. Avoid straw hats with holes that let sunlight through. A darker hat may offer more UV protection.

If you wear a baseball cap, you should also protect your ears and the back of your neck by wearing clothing that covers those areas, using sunscreen, or staying in the shade."

Sunscreen

"Put on broad spectrum sunscreen that filters out both UVA and UVB rays and has an SPF of 15 or higher before you go outside. Don’t forget to put a thick layer on all exposed skin. Get help for hard-to-reach places like your back. And remember, sunscreen works best when combined with other options.

Sunscreen is not recommended for babies who are 6 months old or younger. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommends keeping infants out of the sun during midday and using protective clothing if they have to be in the sun.

SPF. Sunscreens are assigned a sun protection factor (SPF), which is a number that rates how well they filter out UV rays. Higher numbers indicate more protection. You should use a broad spectrum sunscreen with SPF of 15 or higher.

Reapplication. Sunscreen wears off. Put it on again if you stay out in the sun for more than 2 hours and after swimming, sweating, or toweling off.

Expiration date. Check the sunscreen’s expiration date. Sunscreen without an expiration date has a shelf life of no more than 3 years. Its shelf life is shorter if it has been exposed to high temperatures."

https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/basic_info/sun-safety.htm

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