ECLECTIC AVOCATIONS

What kind of hidden talents do PHS students possess?
Weston Thompson proudly poses with his work-in-progress go-kart that he brought to school to work on.
Weston Thompson proudly poses with his work-in-progress go-kart that he brought to school to work on.
Caitlin Belmont

Talents can come in all forms, whether it be athletic, musical, natural, or learned. For many students at PHS, their talents are unusual and unique. 

Some talents can surface when they align with other hobbies or interests. It could be a family member or friend who influences the development of a talent. 

“I hand paint resin miniatures for a tabletop game,” junior Xavier Godsey said. “My older brother played it a lot, and I just sort of got into it after a while, and I stuck on it for about eight years.”

Other talents shine through to help solve a problem or inconvenience. In an attempt to keep her hands warm in the cold, senior Ange Tirbois found a way that she could easily navigate her phone. 

“I was struggling in the winter with my gloves, so I was like, ‘Oh! I’m gonna try it with my nose,’” Tirbois said. “I can see over my nose and type things in with it.” 

I was struggling in the winter with my gloves, so I was like, ‘Oh! I’m gonna try it with my nose’. I can see over my nose and type things in with it.

— senior Ange Tirbois

Many uncommon talents aren’t very practical, but can be popular party tricks. 

“My talent is crab walking really fast,” senior Jon Hawley said. “It was quite interesting when I figured out I could do it.”

Despite being a skill most people wouldn’t use on a daily basis, the crab walk has proven useful in multiple situations. 

“The crab run comes in handy in my dryland workouts when it’s an exercise,” Hawley said. “It also comes in handy during cross-country season during the wacky relays.” 

Some talents are a little more applicable. Sophomore Weston Thompson has a knack for repurposing old equipment into unconventional vehicles. He recently drew a lot of attention to this talent when he showed up to Panther Time with a shopping cart full of mechanical odds and ends. 

I’m currently making a go-kart out of a snowmobile engine and a shopping cart. I’ve also made a mini bike out of something my dad brought home from work and a motor from a four-wheeler.

— sophomore Weston Thompson

“I’m currently making a go-kart out of a snowmobile engine and a shopping cart,” Thompson said. “I’ve also made a mini bike out of something my dad brought home from work and a motor from a four-wheeler.”

Whether these talents are a helpful skill or just a way to entertain, they will stick with these students for life. 

Leave a Comment
More to Discover

Comments (0)

All The Prowl Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *